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plateau

Pronunciation: /plæˈtəʊ; ˈplætəʊ/

Translation of plateau in Spanish:

noun/nombre (plural -teaus or , -teaux /-z/)

  • 1.1 [Geography/Geografía] meseta (feminine) high plateau altiplanicie (feminine), altiplano (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • The Khmer Loeu hill tribes live in remote highland areas in the plateaus and mountainous areas on the edges of Cambodia.
    • This soil region is in the foothills of the Appalachian plateau, and topography ranges from nearly level to extremely steep.
    • Lowlands, plateaux, foothills, and mountain slopes suitable for viticulture occupy only seven per cent of Tajikistan's area.
    1.2 (stable level) meseta (feminine), período (masculine) de estancamiento she lost 8lbs, then reached a plateau adelgazó 8 libras y se estancó
    Example sentences
    • Musically, Brown reached a plateau in the early 1970s when his band, the JBs, patented a muscular, jazzy funk, over which the group's leader could exhort and exclaim.
    • For the past 10 years before that, HIV and AIDS rates in Australia were going down, then they reached a plateau and now we've seen sharp rises.
    • Women's wellbeing reached a plateau between the ages of 30 and 64, while that of men dipped during the same period, according to the survey.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • estancarse*

Phrasal verbs

plateau out

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
estabilizarse*

Definition of plateau in:

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Word of the day repecho
m
steep slope …
Cultural fact of the day

The language of the Basque Country and Navarre is euskera, spoken by around 750,000 people; in Spanish vasco or vascuence. It is also spelled euskara. Basque is unrelated to the Indo-European languages and its origins are unclear. Like Spain's other regional languages, Basque was banned under Franco. With the return of democracy, it became an official language alongside Spanish, in the regions where it is spoken. It is a compulsory school subject and is required for many official and administrative posts in the Basque Country. There is Basque language television and radio and a considerable number of books are published in Basque. See also lenguas cooficiales