Translation of plateau in Spanish:

plateau

Pronunciation: /plæˈtəʊ; ˈplætəʊ/

noun/nombre (plural -teaus or , -teaux /-z/)

  • 1.1 [Geography/Geografía] meseta (feminine) high plateau altiplanicie (feminine), altiplano (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • The Khmer Loeu hill tribes live in remote highland areas in the plateaus and mountainous areas on the edges of Cambodia.
    • This soil region is in the foothills of the Appalachian plateau, and topography ranges from nearly level to extremely steep.
    • Lowlands, plateaux, foothills, and mountain slopes suitable for viticulture occupy only seven per cent of Tajikistan's area.
    1.2 (stable level) meseta (feminine), período (masculine) de estancamiento she lost 8lbs, then reached a plateau adelgazó 8 libras y se estancó
    More example sentences
    • Musically, Brown reached a plateau in the early 1970s when his band, the JBs, patented a muscular, jazzy funk, over which the group's leader could exhort and exclaim.
    • For the past 10 years before that, HIV and AIDS rates in Australia were going down, then they reached a plateau and now we've seen sharp rises.
    • Women's wellbeing reached a plateau between the ages of 30 and 64, while that of men dipped during the same period, according to the survey.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • estancarse*

Phrasal verbs

plateau out

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
estabilizarse*

Definition of plateau in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.