Translation of plenary in Spanish:

plenary

Pronunciation: /ˈpliːnəri/

adj

  • 1.1 [session/meeting] plenario
    More example sentences
    • The observers will play a full role in their groups, take part in committee meetings and attend plenary sessions without voting rights.
    • The plenary meeting met the quorum as it was attended by 31 councillors, or more than two-thirds of the 45 members of the regency council.
    • March would have seen the First Minister and Deputy First Minister and executive confirmed by the Assembly with a plenary meeting of the North South Ministerial Council.
    1.2 (unlimited) plenary powers plenos poderes (mpl) plenary indulgence [Relig] indulgencia (f) plenaria
    More example sentences
    • They take as their point of reference the Holy Year of 1300 when Boniface VIII proclaimed the Church's first Jubilee and granted a plenary indulgence to all pilgrims; 200,000 of the faithful came.
    • A plenary indulgence may be gained each day up to and including November 8th, by visiting a cemetery and there praying for the holy souls and the Pope's intentions.
    • In fact, there was a nice irony in the Pope declaring a plenary indulgence for the millennium year only a few days before the Lutheran / Roman Catholic announcement on justification.

Definition of plenary in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day toque
m
ring …
Cultural fact of the day

peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.