There are 2 translations of pose in Spanish:

pose1

Pronunciation: /pəʊz/

vt

  • 1 (present) [threat] representar; [problem/question] plantear
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    • Since then, it seems the Government has become wiser to the problem posed by the presence of too many ‘culturally incompatible’ foreigners.
    • Among the major considerations to be taken into account would be the rate base of the town and at present that could pose problems.
    • But the disclosures posed presentational problems for the Prime Minister as he made the case for university top-up fees.
    More example sentences
    • ‘You're really enjoying that, aren't you,’ said Graham, making a statement rather than posing a question.
    • And his statement poses vital questions: What does it mean to be a young American citizen in this age?
    • In other words, research is done in order to answer questions posed by theoretical considerations.
  • 2 [Art/Arte] [Photography/Fotografía] [model/subject] hacer* posar

vi

  • 1.1 [Art/Arte] [Photography/Fotografía] posar 1.2 (put on an act) hacerse* el interesante
    More example sentences
    • Moreover, whenever people are shown, they are usually going about their daily business rather than posing or behaving heroically.
    • So while some of the kingpins are posing and posturing with flash and flurry, behind the scenes the big debate on the whys and wherefores of possible arrests is going on.
    • While the elder posed and postured and generally made a bloody nuisance of himself, Hilary makes no grandstanding noises or grandiose gestures, and simply gets on with the job in hand.
    1.3 (pretend to be) to pose as sb/sth hacerse* pasar por algn/algo
    More example sentences
    • The spokesman said the gang is organised and poses as a security firm.
    • On some occasions the gang posed as bird watchers and after the victims left their cars they would smash the windows and grab what valuables they could from the cars.
    • Two men had gained access to the house by posing as policemen.
    More example sentences
    • She didn't change her facial expression in a single one; only in the later pictures did she relax a little and allow the photographers to pose her at all differently to that classic, straight on bust.
    • The photographer had posed the dancers in views and collages that disclosed what he considered the repressed subtexts of the ballets.
    • Anyway, Eisenberg was great and his work is avidly studied by animation artists, especially his knack for posing characters so they have weight and movement.

Definition of pose in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.

There are 2 translations of pose in Spanish:

pose2

n

  • 1.1 (position of body) pose (f), postura (f) she photographed him in a standing pose lo fotografió de pie to strike a pose ponerse* en pose
    More example sentences
    • They will then be photographed in modest poses.
    • In two months he has designed more than 30 of the figures, each in different poses, from a sitting child to a painter due to be suspended from the top of the church tower.
    • Hofker sometimes painted two poses of the same model with similar backgrounds in the same medium.
    1.2 (assumed manner) pose (f), afectación (f) it's just a pose es pura pose or afectación
    More example sentences
    • The president knows that anxiety and anguish are the proper poses to adopt in such times.
    • Then as now, the anti-war forces adopted a pose of moral superiority, but were in fact led by traitors, criminals and terrorists.
    • So they adopt the pose of warrior but never actually place themselves under fire.

Definition of pose in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.