Translation of potted in Spanish:

potted

Pronunciation: /ˈpɑːtəd; ˈpɒtɪd/

adj

  • 1 (before n) 1.1 [plant] en maceta or tiesto a potted bay tree un laurel (plantado) en una maceta
    More example sentences
    • We were recently given several potted bamboo plants.
    • The thieves entered the premises after removing the padlocks with bolt cutters and a substantial number of potted shrubs and herbaceous plants were removed in broad daylight.
    • Before bringing a potted tree indoors, water it thoroughly and hose off the foliage.
    1.2 [Culin] potted meat/shrimpsespecie de paté de carne/camarones
    More example sentences
    • The pair celebrated the occasion at a private reception held in a relative's house - where they dined on Dundee cake, half a pound of potted meat and pop.
    • Take your picnic: like nowhere else in Britain, this place calls for potted meat and pineapple chunks straight from the tin.
    • One man testified that the potted meat had been supplied unsealed but wrapped in brown paper and sold to several people, none of whom fell ill.
    1.3 [account/version] resumido
    More example sentences
    • Herewith a potted description of a great weekend!
    • A potted explanation of what has become his obsession is as follows.
    • I've already posted a potted summary of Australian Political parties, so go read that to learn about the Dramatis Personae.

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peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.