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pottery

Pronunciation: /ˈpɑːtəri; ˈpɒtəri/

Translation of pottery in Spanish:

noun/nombre (plural -ries)

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (vessels) cerámica (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • The Japanese use the word yaki for porcelain, pottery and earthenware alike.
    • The burglars escaped with a hoard of limited edition bone china, porcelain and pottery collectables leaving behind only muddy footprints.
    • The dishes may be round or rectangular and are made of pottery, porcelain, or decorated lacquer.
    1.2 countable/numerable (workshop) alfarería (feminine), taller (masculine) de cerámica
    Example sentences
    • Her Chateau de Bellevue was on the edge of the Meudon Forest, with a long view of the Seine Valley down to Paris, and with the Sevres potteries tucked under the escarpment.
    • The production of commercial tableware began in the late 1800s, and by 1920 potteries had perfected a vitrified china which would not chip or stain in heavy use.
    • No reference to any uphill traffic has been found, though return loads may have been consumables for the brickfields, potteries and coal mines.
    1.3 uncountable/no numerable (craft) alfarería (feminine), cerámica (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • One of the ways the organisation works to keep children off the street is by getting them involved in arts and crafts, like pottery and printing.
    • The chief Bemba crafts are pottery and baskets.
    • Activities will include arts and crafts, pottery, cooking, music and movement, drama, dancing, outdoor games and lots more fun activities.

Definition of pottery in:

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Word of the day trocha
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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.