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prance

Pronunciation: /præns; prɑːns/

Translation of prance in Spanish:

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • 1.1 [horse] brincar*, hacer* cabriolas
    Example sentences
    • While many horses pranced or leapt from the trailer, he walked slowly down the ramp like a seasoned pro.
    • The man didn't glance in the woman's direction, but kept his attention on the auburn-haired girl in front of him, his horse prancing.
    • The horse was prancing excitedly, as if he was proud of himself as well.
    1.2 [pejorative/peyorativo] [person] she pranced into the room wearing her new dress entró meneándose or pavoneándose con el vestido nuevo he comes prancing in at any time he chooses entra como Pedro or Perico por su casa cuando se le da la gana [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • He wears iridescent formal clothes, prances around with a tapering rod that ignites anything it touches, and trails a gust of hot air.
    • I'm starting to see the whole experience as a bizarre holiday, behaving like an uninvited guest who dresses up and prances around the football pitch every evening.
    • The cast prances, postures, and palpitates appositely, fully aware that real acting would be de trop.

Phrasal verbs

prance about

1.1verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio brincar* 1.2verb + preposition + object/verbo + preposición + complemento brincar* en

Definition of prance in:

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Word of the day trascendencia
f
significance …
Cultural fact of the day

El Cid (from Arabic "sid" or "master") was the name given to Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (born Vivar, near Burgos, c1043). He is Spain's warrior hero, being brave and warlike but also loyal and fair. He grew up in the court of Fernando I of Castile and later fought against the Moors, earning the title, Campeador. He married Jimena, granddaughter of Alfonso VI, "the Wise." In 1089, after a disagreement with the king, he and his loyal retainers went into exile, recapturing Valencia from the Moors. He died in 1099 and his deeds are the subject of many oral accounts, the most complete being El Cantar del Mío Cid. His sword, La Tizona, is in a museum in Burgos.