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prayer

Pronunciation: /prer; preə(r)/

Translation of prayer in Spanish:

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (praying) oración (feminine) the power of prayer el poder de la oración the king was at prayer el rey estaba orando the Prayer Book[ devocionario tradicional de la Iglesia Anglicana ] 1.2 countable/numerable (request, petition) oración (feminine), plegaria (feminine) my prayers were answered mis plegarias fueron atendidas or escuchadas the Lord's Prayer el Padrenuestro to say one's prayers rezar*, orar [formal] to say a prayer rezar* una oración a prayer for sb/sth una oración por algn/algo not to have a prayer [colloquial/familiar] no tener* ni la más mínima or remota posibilidad
    Example sentences
    • The milder and more beneficent forces of nature were addressed as female deities and invoked with prayers.
    • Human beings are addressing God in prayers for help against the inducements of the devil.
    • God answers our prayers because by addressing them to Him we acknowledge His Lordship and power.
    Example sentences
    • Swan will carry the hopes and prayers of Ireland as the country's current equine hero seeks to retain his crown.
    • She started the restaurant when her marriage dissolved, on little but hope and prayers.
    • Our deepest sympathies, prayers and best wishes go out to our fellow citizens who were injured in the blast.
    1.3 (service) Morning/Evening Prayer oficio (masculine) de maitines/vísperas ([ en la Iglesia Anglicana ])

Definition of prayer in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.