Translation of prefect in Spanish:

prefect

Pronunciation: /ˈpriːfekt/

n

  • 1 (British English/inglés británico) [Education/Educación] alumno encargado de la disciplina monitor, (masculine, feminine)
    More example sentences
    • The school chapel became the focal point of life, discipline was enforced through prefects and team games emphasized.
    • It turned out that we weren't allowed to play too close to the school entrance (though nobody had told me) and this girl was a monitor - junior school equivalent of a prefect.
    • She has organised a charity talent contest and, as a form representative and one of the school's first prefects, she has helped her classmates and younger pupils at the school.
  • 2 2.1 (official) prefecto (masculine) prefect of police prefecto de policía 2.2 [History/Historia] prefecto (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • A passion drama, in my opinion, should certainly mention the undisputed fact that Caiaphas was dependent on the Roman prefect, Pontius Pilate, to retain his position as high priest.
    • The head of the civil administration as far as Britain was concerned was the praetorian prefect of the Gauls, based in Trier, to whom the vicarius of the British diocese was responsible.
    • The provinces were grouped into larger administrative units called a diocese, ruled by a governor general who answered to a praetorian prefect, who in turn answered to one of the tetrarchs.

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