Translation of preoccupation in Spanish:

preoccupation

Pronunciation: /priːˌɑːkjəˈpeɪʃən; ˌpriːɒkjʊˈpeɪʃən/

noun/nombre

  • 1 c and u 1.1 (concern) preocupación (feminine) my main preoccupation was not to offend my parents mi mayor preocupación era no ofender a mis padres she is only concerned with her own private preoccupations no piensa nada más que en sus propias preocupaciones
    More example sentences
    • Man Listening To Disc and Marginalia are creepily accurate portrayals of aspects of my two main preoccupations.
    • Melburnians tend to have two main preoccupations, the two S's: sport and Sydney.
    • Much more interesting is the fact that Larkin waited so confidently for his methods and preoccupations to come into focus.
    1.2 (obsession) obsesión (feminine)preoccupation with sth she was criticized for her preoccupation with work la criticaron por pensar demasiado en el trabajo his excessive preoccupation with hygiene su manía or su obsesión con la higiene
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (absorbed state of mind) preocupación (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • The real escalation is in our narcissistic preoccupation with ourselves.
    • Moreover, Lyly's preoccupation with mistaken identity may have influenced Shakespeare.
    • The saving grace of the past few days has been my preoccupation with a new geeky toy, a DVD recorder.

Definition of preoccupation in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day sigla
f
abbreviation …
Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.