Translation of printing in Spanish:

printing

Pronunciation: /ˈprɪntɪŋ/

noun/nombre

  • 1 [Printing/Imprenta] 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (act, process, result) impresión (feminine) the printing is poor la impresión es mala the invention of printing la invención de la imprenta (before noun/delante del nombre) [ink/error] de imprenta 1.2 countable/numerable (quantity printed) edición (feminine), tirada (feminine) the book is in its fifth printing el libro va por la quinta edición
    More example sentences
    • Will new printings of traditional books be issued on demand, or printed in advance and warehoused?
    • A microfiche edition of the first printings of Mathilde's works has recently been published by IDC in the Netherlands.
    • A sufficiently high number of pre-orders would push the book into multiple printings early on and guarantee a high ranking.
    1.3 uncountable/no numerable (trade) imprenta (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Before the invention of printing, books were produced entirely by hand by a series of painters, calligraphers, and binders.
    • Nicholas V died in 1455, unaware of Johannes Gutenberg's invention of printing with moveable metal types in Mainz, Germany.
    • The importance of his book is that it was printed (book printing was invented just a short time before by Gutenberg) and many copies were therefore available.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (handwriting) letra (feminine) de imprenta or de molde
    More example sentences
    • The printing was hurried and the cramped letters ran together as if Alec had been in a great hurry to get them on paper.
    • I'm not sure how many years I received instruction, but I think cursive and printing might have been different years.
    • It was hard and white, and the printing on top was someone's flawless handwriting to ‘Mr. William Gale.’

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.