Translation of privation in Spanish:

privation

Pronunciation: /ˌpraɪˈveɪʃən/

n

uncountable or countable/no numerable o numerable
  • [formal] privación (feminine) they endured great privation pasaron muchas privaciones
    More example sentences
    • The fight for survival was the topical issue in Italy after World War II and privations, hardships and misery were everywhere.
    • Man per man, the average Confederate soldier made more hard marches, suffered more privations, risked his life more frequently, was wounded more times, and died more often than the average Union soldier.
    • She spoke of tense meetings as mothers faced a terrible dilemma: keep their children close and have them suffer the privations of the camp, or send them to the other side of the world.
    More example sentences
    • By arguing in such a way, Mr. Hart draws upon and restates, with verve and ornament, the classical Christian view that all evil is an absence, a privation of good.
    • Evil is merely privative, not absolute: it is like cold, which is the privation of heat.
    • It points to a privation of being, to the absence of moral, spiritual being, in Panurge.

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Spain's War of Independence against Napoleon Bonaparte's French occupation was ignited by the popular revolt in Madrid on 2 May 1808 against the French army. With support from the Duke of Wellington, Spanish resistance continued for over five years in a guerra de guerrillas which gave the world the concept and the term guerrilla warfare. The autocratic Fernando VII was restored to the throne in 1814, and his first act was to abolish the progressive Constitution of Cadiz adopted in 1812.