Translation of probability in Spanish:

probability

Pronunciation: /ˌprɑːbəˈbɪləti; ˌprɒbəˈbɪlɪti/

n (pl -ties)

u c
  • 1.1 (likelihood) probabilidad (f) in all probability they will lose their jobs es muy probable que pierdan su trabajo there is little probability that she'll come o of her coming es poco probable que venga, hay pocas probabilidades de que venga what are the probabilities for a Democratic victory? (AmE) ¿qué probabilidades hay de una victoria democrática?
    More example sentences
    • They will continue to kidnap because probability shows that the chance of being caught and prosecuted in Trinidad is slim.
    • The laws of probability say it cannot happen but Maine Road is still too fresh in the minds of Minstermen everywhere for it to be ignored just yet.
    • He agreed with the coroner that on the balance of probability it was likely someone else had been in the graveyard when the stone fell on Adam.
    1.2 [Math] probabilidad (f)
    More example sentences
    • In the field of mathematics he worked on probability, recurring decimals and the theory of equations.
    • Among seven people, there is about a 60 percent probability that two will have birthdays within a week of each other.
    • When there are twice as many attackers as defenders, the winning probability exceeds 80 percent.

Definition of probability in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day toque
m
ring …
Cultural fact of the day

peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.