There are 2 translations of prodigal in Spanish:

prodigal1

Pronunciation: /ˈprɑːdɪgəl; ˈprɒdɪgəl/

adj

  • 1.1 (wasteful) pródigo, despilfarrador to be prodigal with o [formal]of sth ser* pródigo con algo, despilfarrar algo the prodigal son [Bib] el hijo pródigo 1.2 (lavish) [formal] pródigo to be prodigal with oof sth ser* pródigo en algo
    More example sentences
    • It is short-sighted and a prodigal use of limited resources.
    • Call me reckless, prodigal even, but I've been spending up big on electricity.
    • Above all, the Executive must curb its own prodigal spending.
    More example sentences
    • Beside the little plateau a rocky basin of roughly the same shape and dimensions caught the thundering water in its downward rush, tossing it high, splashing and spraying, breezing falling flowers and mist with prodigal liberality.
    • Caesar, or Christ, that is the question: the vast, attractive, skeptical world, with its pleasures and ambitions and its prodigal promise, or the meek, majestic, and winning figure of Him of Nazareth?
    • As a small boy, Stephen showed few signs of prodigal genius; he was slow to learn to read but liked to take things apart - a way of ‘finding out how the world around me worked’.

Definition of prodigal in:

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Word of the day mandíbula
f
jaw …
Cultural fact of the day

Today is Fiesta de Santiago (St James' Day). The famous Camino de Santiago, the pilgrimage of thousands of people from all over Spain and many other parts of Europe to the holy city of Santiago de Compostela, takes place in the week leading up to St James' Day, 25 July. The city also has its fiestas around this time. The streets are full of musicians and performers for two weeks of celebrations culminating in the Festival del Apóstol.

There are 2 translations of prodigal in Spanish:

prodigal2

n

  • [formal] despilfarrador, -dora (m,f)
    More example sentences
    • When it comes to love, God is the great prodigal - extravagant, a spendthrift, and oblivious to cost.
    • In reckless extravagance he outdid the prodigals of all times in ingenuity… and set before his guests loaves and meats of gold, declaring that a man ought either to be frugal or be Caesar.
    • This includes not just creditors but, above all, the little man who is forced to keep his meager savings in the form of cash, i.e., paper money open to plunder by the prodigal which is the consortium of the banks and the government.

Definition of prodigal in:

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Word of the day mandíbula
f
jaw …
Cultural fact of the day

Today is Fiesta de Santiago (St James' Day). The famous Camino de Santiago, the pilgrimage of thousands of people from all over Spain and many other parts of Europe to the holy city of Santiago de Compostela, takes place in the week leading up to St James' Day, 25 July. The city also has its fiestas around this time. The streets are full of musicians and performers for two weeks of celebrations culminating in the Festival del Apóstol.