Translation of progressive in Spanish:

progressive

Pronunciation: /prəˈgresɪv/

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1 [attitude/thinker/measure] progresista a progressive school una escuela activa
    More example sentences
    • People have high expectations about Labor, the party of reform and progressive ideas.
    • Although a right-wing neo-conservative, he's quite progressive on social policy and this gives him a certain desirability.
    • The progressive beliefs and social justice we stand for, our core, must not be altered.
  • 2 (steadily increasing) [deterioration/improvement] progresivo
    More example sentences
    • In contrast, tumors and ototoxic medications produce slowly progressive unilateral or bilateral lesions.
    • Furthermore, heart failure is a progressive condition: once symptoms appear, subsequent morbidity and mortality are high.
    • An elderly black woman was readmitted to the hospital from a nursing home because of progressive weakness.
  • 3 [Linguistics/Lingüística] continuo
    More example sentences
    • One has to say, rather, I am writing a letter, with the progressive aspect.
    • I mean, so what if I use stative verbs in the progressive form, or use Chinese language structure for my English in daily usage?
    • The same can be said of his frequent use of progressive verbs (gerunds).

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.