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puffed

Pronunciation: /pʌft/

Translation of puffed in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo

  • 1.1 [sleeve] abombado, abullonado
    Example sentences
    • The Eighties influence makes itself felt again in party wear, with slashed necklines, puffed sleeves, waists and skirts, halterneck tops and the accessory of accessories: the belt.
    • Summertime brings out the little girl in all of us: bubble-gum pink, flirty skirts, puffed sleeves.
    • She wore a flowing pale yellow skirt with ruffles and a silken blouse with puffed sleeves.
    1.2puffed (out) (out of breath) (British English/inglés británico) [colloquial/familiar] sin aliento [colloquial/familiar]
    Example sentences
    • After ten minutes or so, when the poor little puffed-out chap was having a breather, a smaller bird (most probably his wife, judging by the way she pecked him in the head six times) appeared and took over.
    • He was wearing dark shorts and a dark singlet with old white runners when he approached the girl and he was puffed out after having run up to her.
    • We started jogging and after the first one, he was puffed out.

Definition of puffed in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.