There are 2 translations of quadruple in Spanish:

quadruple1

Pronunciation: /kwɑːˈdruːpəl; kwɒˈdruːpl; ˈkwɒdrʊpl/

adj

  • 1.1 (fourfold) cuádruple, cuádruplo
    More example sentences
    • For linguistics nerds this is like a quadruple vodka.
    • The 16-stone defendant had drunk several pints of beer, alcopops and a quadruple vodka.
    • Hornewer is demanding over $2 million for a rematch, about quadruple what Byrd earned in April.
    1.2 (with four parts) cuádruple, cuádruplo
    More example sentences
    • Four years later he suffered more attacks and needed a quadruple heart bypass that left him with kidney failure.
    • He also has overcome bladder cancer and a quadruple bypass on his heart.
    • I have also worked on patients during three LVAD implant operations and one quadruple coronary by-pass operation.
    1.3 [Music/Música] [time] de cuatro por cuatro
    More example sentences
    • Triple chants have been composed and a few quadruple chants also exist, but in use these become tiresome.
    • The second piece is a Gavotta, a moderate dance in quadruple meter.
    • All of sudden he does this incredible run where he goes up two octaves and back down in quadruple time.

Definition of quadruple in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of quadruple in Spanish:

quadruple2

Definition of quadruple in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.