Translation of qualification in Spanish:

qualification

Pronunciation: /ˌkwɑːləfəˈkeɪʃən; ˌkwɒlɪfɪˈkeɪʃən/

n

  • 1 c 1.1 [Educ] she has a teaching qualification tiene título de maestra/profesora his qualifications are very good está muy bien calificado or (Esp) cualificado with all his qualifications, he still couldn't get a job a pesar de su excelente currículum or preparación, no pudo conseguir trabajo she has no paper qualifications no tiene títulos ni diplomas
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    • All doctors with foreign qualifications have to pass examinations in South Africa before they could register, said Tshabalala-Msimang.
    • The majority of social workers in the country are still waiting for official recognition of their professional status and qualifications.
    • All courses lead to recognised qualifications.
    1.2 (skill, necessary attribute) requisito (m) the essential qualification is enthusiasm el requisito esencial or lo que hay que tener es entusiasmo
  • 2 u 2.1 (eligibility) derecho (m) their qualification for financial assistance su derecho a percibir ayuda económica 2.2 (being accepted) clasificación (f) qualification for the finals was all they hoped for no esperaban más que clasificarse para la final
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    • They say nurses working in Nunavik, James Bay, Lower North Shore and remote First Nations communities need recognition of past experience when they seek qualification as a nurse practitioner.
    • The trainee primary and secondary school teachers claim they were lured into the profession with false promises that their age and experience would be recognised on qualification.
    • The fact that it is possible for a doctor to continue to practice for decades after qualification without ever opening a book or taking any other steps to keep up to date has long seemed indefensible.
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    • What are the basic qualifications and aptitude required?
    • The three C's that credit creditors look at when determining their qualification are capacity, character, and collateral.
    • There is no one of sufficient stature, no impartial media, and no intellectuals with adequate qualifications and credibility to arbitrate.
  • 3 u c 3.1 (reservation) reserva (f) to agree without qualification aceptar sin reservas or condiciones I should like to add a few qualifications quisiera hacer algunas salvedades or matizar algunos puntos 3.2 (to accounts) salvedad (f), reparo (m)
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    • Its 50 pages are filled with so many assertions, half-truths and qualifications as to render it worthless.
    • The only qualification to this statement is in reference to rooting of the ingroup relative to outgroup taxa.
    • Doubtless people will disagree, but I think the former is a much stronger statement without the qualification.
  • 4 u [Ling] calificación (f)
    More example sentences
    • The first element in the phrase is an adverb, an adverbial qualification or an object (direct or indirect).
    • In English, the definite article, the demonstrative and the qualification adjective are neutral as to gender variation.
    • I now believe that de la Grasserie's semantic characterization is more accurate in this respect: a nominal construct with a personal possessive pronoun brings into the picture a further qualification of the noun phrase than does the noun phrase with just a definite article.

Definition of qualification in:

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