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queasy

Pronunciation: /ˈkwiːzi/

Translation of queasy in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo (-sier, -siest)

  • 1.1 (sick) mareado the motion made him (feel) queasy se mareó con el movimiento my stomach's a bit queasy tengo el estómago revuelto
    Example sentences
    • She gets sick in cars and queasy whenever she steps on board a boat.
    • Towards the end of the time that I was spraying with Metasystox, I began to feel queasy, a bit sick and would be starting a headache which became very bad and which, even after taking paracetamol would not clear up.
    • The train journey was filled with little aggravating child noises and I was sitting in the wrong direction so arrive in LA feeling queasy and dizzy.
    1.2 (uneasy) intranquilo
    Example sentences
    • The work combines a fourth-form puerility with a satirical current, one that leaves the viewer slightly queasy.
    • Yet, for all that, it was hard not to feel slightly queasy about the prospects for the remainder of the Scottish season.
    • All of which makes me feel slightly queasy and disinclined to buy so much as a new face cloth.

Definition of queasy in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's literary renaissance, known as the Golden Age (Siglo de Oro/i>), roughly covers the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It includes the Italian-influenced poetry of figures such as Garcilaso de la Vega; the religious verse of Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Ávila and San Juan de la Cruz; picaresque novels such as the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes and Quevedo's Buscón; Miguel de Cervantes' immortal Don Quijote; the theater of Lope de Vega, and the ornate poetry of Luis de Góngora.