There are 2 translations of raft in Spanish:

raft1

Pronunciation: /ræft; rɑːft/

n

  • 1 1.1 [Nautical/Náutica] balsa (f), almadía (f)
    More example sentences
    • It turned out that the chopper was homing in on the emergency locator beacon that activated when the raft was inflated.
    • They were taking down our coordinates every 15 minutes in case we got washed under and had to take the rubber raft and jump into our survival suits.
    • He and pilot Russell Phillips managed to survive 47 days on a rubber raft with no provisions amidst menacing swarms of sharks.
    1.2 (anchored off beach) plataforma (feminine)
  • 2 (large amount) (American English/inglés norteamericano) [colloquial/familiar], montón (masculine) [colloquial/familiar], pila (feminine) (Latin America/América Latina) [colloquial/familiar] rafts of trouble montones or (in Latin America also/en América Latina también) pilas de problemas [colloquial/familiar], la tira de problemas [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Introduced under the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 2001, the tickets cover a raft of minor public order and anti-social behaviour offences.
    • More than 50 employers take part in the Sharrow project which uses a raft of display boards in shops and libraries to advertise details of job opportunities.
    • The team has worked hard with police to secure a raft of anti-social behaviour orders in the last year.

Definition of raft in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of raft in Spanish:

raft2

vi

  • ir* en balsa

Definition of raft in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.