There are 2 translations of rattle in Spanish:

rattle1

Pronunciation: /ˈrætl/

n

  • 1 (no plural/sin plural) (noise) ruido (m); (of train, carriage) traqueteo (m) there's a rattle somewhere in this car algo está vibrando en el coche the rattle of hailstones el golpeteo or tamborileo del granizo death rattle estertor (masculine) de la muerte
    More example sentences
    • In the distance there is the rapid rattle of a Kalashnikov.
    • Somewhere around Parliament House, the rattle turned to a clunk.
    • There's the rattle and clang of the air lock opening and closing, and it seems she has worn her lead-weighted diving boots home.

Definition of rattle in:

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Word of the day moto
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Cultural fact of the day

The variety of catalán spoken in the Balearic Islands is called mallorquín. Some people regard it as a separate language from Catalan, which enjoys official status, but it is not officially recognized as such.

There are 2 translations of rattle in Spanish:

rattle2

vi

  • 1.1 (make noise) hacer* ruido; (vibrate) vibrar I heard a key rattle in the lock oí el ruido de una llave en la cerradura the chain rattled in the wind el viento hacía sonar la cadena something in this car rattles hay algo en el coche que está haciendo ruido or vibrando your door's rattling tu puerta vibra the hail rattled on the plastic el granizo golpeteaba en or repiqueteaba sobre el plástico he started rattling at the door empezó a sacudir la puerta
    More example sentences
    • A sharp series of knocks rattled the door in its frame.
    • To sit in it on a windy day was an experience in itself as you listened to the wind whistling through and rattling the galvanised roof.
    • Thunder rattled the windows and lightning gave an eerie and unworldly light to halls.
    1.2 (move) (+ adverb complement/+ adverbio predicativo) the carriage rattled over the cobblestones el carruaje traqueteaba por el empedrado there's something rattling around in the back hay algo suelto allí atrás
    More example sentences
    • Soon, dozens of guests began pouring in, their carriages rattling past the front door and around to the back.
    • The carriage rattled along the narrow, winding streets to Montemarte, where the Basilica of the Sacre Couer lay.
    • Drags of empty coal cars rattle past on their westward run.

vt

  • 1 (make rattle) hacer* sonar he was rattling coins in a box agitaba una caja haciendo sonar las monedas que había dentro the ghost rattled its chains el fantasma sacudía sus cadenas he started furiously rattling pots and pans empezó, furioso, a hacer ruido con los cacharros he rattled the door until I opened it sacudió la puerta hasta que le abrí
  • 2 (worry, scare) [colloquial/familiar] poner* nervioso to get sb rattled poner* nervioso a algn, hacerle* perder la calma a algn
    More example sentences
    • Jack's presence rattled Wilson, reminding him of Henry as a little boy showing Jack how to work the old cash register.
    • The sight of Anna, not the slightest bit ruffled, rattled him severely.
    • He looked at the capable assistant with sincere eyes knowing that this would rattle him into some flustered explanation of his whereabouts.

Phrasal verbs

rattle off

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento
[names/list] recitar, decir* de un tirón

rattle on

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio
hablar or [colloquial/familiar] parlotear sin parar

rattle through

verb + preposition + object/verbo + preposición + complemento
[speech] decir* rápidamente, apurar (Latin America/América Latina) they rattled through the rest of the performance terminaron la actuación a las carreras [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of rattle in:

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Word of the day moto
f
motorcycle …
Cultural fact of the day

The variety of catalán spoken in the Balearic Islands is called mallorquín. Some people regard it as a separate language from Catalan, which enjoys official status, but it is not officially recognized as such.