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reality

Pronunciation: /riˈæləti/

Translation of reality in Spanish:

noun/nombre (plural -ties)

  • 1 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (real existence) realidad (feminine)
    Example sentences
    • But when image is your concern, the unpleasant realities of war present big problems.
    • It wants to make sure it cannot actually focus on the realities of family life.
    • Some of these children have their own first-hand experience of the realities of war.
    1.2 c and u (actual circumstances) realidad (feminine) the realities of life la realidad de la vida to become (a) reality hacerse* realidad in reality en realidad
    Example sentences
    • You see, a long time ago, some academic came up with the idea that reality doesn't actually exist.
    • It has kept all of us in touch with reality as it exists in Tokyo and Japan along with a better understanding of what Tokyo and Japan are all about.
    • Recognition and acceptance of truth and reality replaces false ideas.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (realism) realismo (masculine)
    Example sentences
    • Harsh reality is created with striking clarity throughout the collection, leaving the reader both awed and dismayed.
    • He loved acting and the people that were in it and that could produce and create moments of great reality.
    • Only when films regain the sparks of creativity, originality and reality, will we see crowds in cinema halls again.

Definition of reality in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.