Translation of recast in Spanish:

recast

Pronunciation: /riːˈkæst; riːˈkɑːst/

vt (past tense & past participle/pasado y participio pasado recast)

  • 1 1.1 [bell/canon] refundir
    More example sentences
    • This metal would be recast into additional cannon.
    • He had achieved his object by sawing the bars into irregular pieces, collecting the sawdust in tough, plastic bags and melting and recasting some of the pieces as cubes in obviously home-made moulds.
    • The bell was melted down and recast, then rung carefully for special events.
    1.2 [formal] [sentence/paragraph] volver* a escribir or redactar; [system/project] reestructurar
    More example sentences
    • The Algerian experience led the French government to recast its African presence in terms of a new political role.
    • It was a knowledge that would allow him to impose a true revolution upon the generals and to recast the entire structure of the armed forces.
    • Before his present comical manoeuvrings, he had made a series of thoughtful speeches on how Britishness could be recast for modern times, an issue of importance to unionists in every part of the UK.
  • 2 [Theater/Teatro] the play has been recast le han cambiado el reparto or el elenco a la obra, la obra tiene un nuevo reparto or elenco the part was recast le dieron el papel a otro actor the major roles have been recast han cambiado a los actores de los papeles principales
    More example sentences
    • These are the two most significant changes to the new version, and they completely recast the film, I remember the first film as cold, brutal, and ugly, but the new version has been significantly changed in other respects.
    • Now it's been recast with African-American actors and remade as Love Don't Cost a Thing.
    • Television has intervened, of course, but you could still recast the popular soaps each week and still not make much of a dent in the Equity dole queue.

Definition of recast in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.