Translation of relation in Spanish:

relation

Pronunciation: /rɪˈleɪʃən/

noun/nombre

  • 1 countable/numerable (relative) pariente (masculine and feminine), pariente, (masculine, feminine), familiar (masculine and feminine) he's no relation (of mine) no es pariente mío, no estamos emparentados pictured are John Hull and James Hull (no relation) en la fotografía aparecen John Hull y James Hull, quienes no están emparentados what relation is she to you? ¿qué parentesco tiene contigo?, ¿a ti qué te toca? (Spain/España) [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Had he not been his brother and his closest relation, he would have murdered him in cold blood.
    • He is survived by his wife Tess, three sons and two daughters, family relations and a host of friends he made through the music business.
    • The definition does not include your cousins or any relations by marriage.
  • 2 2.1 u and c (connection) relación (feminine) there is a close relation between poverty and ill health hay una relación muy estrecha entre la pobreza y la mala salud to bear no relation to sth no guardar ninguna relación con algo 2.2in relation to (as preposition/como preposición) en relación con, con relación a
    More example sentences
    • It may also be hard to see the relation between cause and effect.
    • If, however, we adopt the second hypothesis, we have to inquire only as to the relation between cause and effect.
    • What is the causal relation between the pattern of division and cell differentiation?
  • 3
    (relations plural)
    relaciones (feminine plural) to establish/break off/restore relations (with sb/sth) establecer*/romper*/restablecer* relaciones (con algn/algo) to have sexual relations with sb tener* relaciones sexuales con algn

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The National Police (Policía Nacional) was set up in Spain in 1976. Its members patrol provincial capitals and big cities, which are responsible for its finance, administration, and recruitment. Although armed, it has never been considered a repressive force, unlike the Guardia Civil.