There are 2 translations of relish in Spanish:

relish1

Pronunciation: /ˈrelɪʃ/

vt

  • they won't relish having to walk no les va a hacer ninguna or ni pizca de gracia tener que ir a pie I don't relish the thought/prospect of … no me entusiasma or no me hace ninguna gracia la idea/perspectiva de … if you like horror movies, you'll relish this one si te gustan las películas de terror, esta te va a encantar or disfrutarás muchísimo de esta she smiled, relishing her moment of triumph se sonrió, saboreando su momento de triunfo

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of relish in Spanish:

relish2

n

  • 2 u (enjoyment) with relish con gusto, con fruición [read/listen to] con placer, con deleite [work] con entusiasmo, con gusto to have a relish for sth disfrutar mucho de algo

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Word of the day caudillo
m
leader …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.