Translation of reluctant in Spanish:

reluctant

Pronunciation: /rɪˈlʌktənt/

adjective/adjetivo

  • reacio, renuente he's a reluctant teetotaler/vegetarian es abstemio/vegetariano a su pesar or a regañadientes they gave their reluctant consent to the proposal accedieron a la propuesta con grandes reservasto be reluctant to + infinitive/infinitivo they were reluctant to admit they had been wrong les costaba admitir que se habían equivocado she seemed very reluctant to tell us what had happened parecía muy reacia or renuente a decirnos qué había pasado, no parecía muy dispuesta a decirnos qué había pasado I'm reluctant to sell this chair me resisto a deshacerme de esta silla
    More example sentences
    • There are a lot of people, though, who would be very reluctant to let our traditional flag go.
    • But people appear increasingly reluctant to intervene in public places.
    • What on earth could be in our files that made them so reluctant to give us access?

Definition of reluctant in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.