Translation of repay in Spanish:

repay

Pronunciation: /riːˈpeɪ/

transitive verb/verbo transitivo (past tense & past participle/pasado y participio pasado repaid)

  • 1.1 [money/loan] devolver*; [debt] pagar*, cancelar I have to repay him tengo que devolverle el dinero
    More example sentences
    • Making sure you can repay your mortgage loan is one of the most basic financial needs
    • The loans were converted into shares when Orb Estates proved unable to repay the loans and under stock exchange rules Lynch Talbot was required to bid for the rest of the company at stg 60p.
    • A plan loan must be secured so that, in the event the participant is unable to repay the loan, the security is available to satisfy the participant's outstanding loan obligation.
    1.2 [kindness/hospitality/favor] pagar*, corresponder a how can I ever repay you your generosity? no sé cómo voy a poder corresponder a su generosidad this is how you repay me! ¡así me lo pagas! the novel is difficult to read, but it repays the effort la novela es difícil de leer pero vale la pena el esfuerzo or te resarce del esfuerzoto repay sb for sth I'd like to repay them for their kindness quisiera corresponder a su amabilidad
    More example sentences
    • For So Little Time, Coleman repays the favour, joining Otter's band for three of the album's eight tracks.
    • Maybe we can hope that she'll repay the favour on their next outing.
    • If William II visited John Peter in the west and John repaid the favour in London, we might inquire what opportunities for social broadening a visit by John or Will Peter to their London cousin entailed.

Definition of repay in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.