Translation of retention in Spanish:

retention

Pronunciation: /rɪˈtentʃən; rɪˈtenʃən/

noun/nombre

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 (of heat, moisture) retención (feminine), conservación (feminine) water retention retención de líquidos
    More example sentences
    • So, for instance, fissures in the underlying bedrock or a man-made trench or pit will often fill with soils and matter that have greater moisture retention and more nutrients than the surrounding, undisturbed subsoil.
    • Labor and time are saved when the farmer doesn't plow the field, and the organic matter sitting on the soil works effectively to decrease water run-off and erosion and boost the soil's nutrient retention.
    • Gums help low-fat cheese products retain their shape, cuttability, melting characteristics, spreadability and moisture retention.
    1.2 (of system, law) mantenimiento (masculine), conservación (feminine)
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    • The most common rationale for war was acquisition or retention of territory.
    • Selective retention would include a plan to keep employees in the top three groups.
    • Projects must meet a specific physical test for retention of existing walls and internal structural framework.
    1.3 (of property, money) retención (feminine) 1.4 (mental faculty) retentiva (feminine)
    More example sentences
    • Do you hold store in ‘knowledge’ or retention of facts as an identifier to intellectual ability?
    • ‘Just one administration of the drug resulted in very potent memory retention,’ which may last as long as 21 days, he says.
    • Processing speed doesn't matter in the brain, says Hawkins, because the basis of thought is not data manipulation but memory retention and prediction.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.