There are 2 translations of route in Spanish:

route1

Pronunciation: /ruːt; raʊt; ruːt/

n

  • 1.1 (way) camino (m), ruta (f); (of bus) ruta (f), recorrido (m) that's not my normal route ese no es el camino que suelo tomar air/sea route ruta aérea/marítima it's near the number fourteen bus route está cerca de la ruta or del recorrido del 14 if you want to go that route (AmE) [colloquial/familiar] si quieres hacerlo de esa manera 1.2 (highway) (AmE) carretera (f), ruta (f) (RPl) 1.3 (delivery round) (AmE) recorrido (m) she does a newspaper route hace un reparto de periódicos 1.4 [Med] via the oral/anal route por vía oral/anal

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Word of the day órbita
f
orbit …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.

There are 2 translations of route in Spanish:

route2

(pres p routing or (BrE also) , routeing)

vt

  • enviar* the supplies were routed through France enviaron las provisiones a través de Francia the plane was routed through Frankfurt to avoid the fog desviaron el avión a Francfort debido a la niebla

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Word of the day órbita
f
orbit …
Cultural fact of the day

The most famous celebrations of Holy Week in the Spanish-speaking world are held in Seville. Lay brotherhoods, cofradías, process through the city in huge parades between Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Costaleros bear the pasos, huge floats carrying religious figures made of painted wood. Others, nazarenos (Nazarenes) and penitentes (penitents) walk alongside the pasos, in their distinctive costumes. During the processions they sing saetas, flamenco verses mourning Christ's passion. The Seville celebrations date back to the sixteenth century.