Translation of rump in Spanish:

rump

Pronunciation: /rʌmp/

n

  • 1.1 c (of horse) grupa (f), ancas (fpl); (of bird) rabadilla (f)
    More example sentences
    • They have a strongly undulating flight pattern, and they can be easily identified in flight by this pattern and their prominent white rumps.
    • Their bellies and flanks are white, and their rumps are black.
    • In flight, they show gray and white underwings, solid gray upperwings, white rumps, and gray tails.
    1.2 u [Culin] cadera (f), cuadril (m) (RPl) (before n) rump steak filete (m) de cadera, churrasco (m) de cuadril (RPl) 1.3 c (bottom) [colloq & hum] trasero (m) [familiar/colloquial], culo (m) [fam: en algunas regiones vulg], traste (m) [familiar/colloquial]
    More example sentences
    • Perhaps the end of our affair with TV chefs will mean we actually get off our rumps to make a bit more effort in the kitchen.
    • He finally allows his eyes to wander over the rumps of his female colleagues.
    • The strong hand around his thick neck loosened and his rump landed on the ground.
    1.4 c (remnant) resto (m) the rump of the defeated army lo que quedaba del ejército derrotado there was just a rump left quedaban solo unos pocos
    More example sentences
    • Meanwhile he ruled over a French rump state based in the spa town of Vichy.
    • The new Liberal Unionist group he attached himself to never made it up with the rump of the Liberal Party, and eventually allied with the Conservatives.
    • A rump force of 200 is holed up in a town near the Iranian border.

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