There are 2 translations of sack in Spanish:

sack1

Pronunciation: /sæk/

n

  • 1 countable/numerable 1.1 (large bag) saco (m), costal (m)
    More example sentences
    • Each one, after scrutiny, found something of value to add to his sack: paper, plastic bags, bits of cardboard.
    • We had our bikes, our waterproofs and our special thick plastic newspaper sacks to keep the newsprint nice and dry.
    • The changes will mean residents placing their rubbish in a suitable container or into strong plastic sacks.
    1.2 (paper bag) (American English/inglés norteamericano) bolsa (feminine) (de papel)
  • 2 (dismissal) [colloquial/familiar] to give sb the sack echar a algn (del trabajo), botar a algn (del trabajo) (Latin America/América Latina) [colloquial/familiar] they all got the sack los echaron a todos, los botaron a todos (Latin America/América Latina) [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Rowena Henson was soon given the sack over another matter.
    • The majority of workers have now received the early retirement package and wage arrears with the exception of eight who were, instead, given the sack.
    • I got the sack from Woolworth's for fighting with the under-manager in the stock room, and then went back to the youth employment officer.
    More example sentences
    • Oh, and I bet you I am SO much better in the sack than her.
    • It wasn't like she was trying to get us all in the sack.
    • I was doing him a favor, really, if you think about it - him and any girl unfortunate enough to end up in the sack with him in the future.
  • 4 (pillage) the sack of Rome el saqueo de Roma the town was put to the sack saquearon la ciudad
    More example sentences
    • The statue must have been damaged during the sack of the city by the Franks in 355 AD.
    • The armor is engraved with scenes of Roman days to come: Romulus and Remus, the founding of the republic, the sack of the city by Gauls.
    • Strabo does not, however, explicitly refer to the sack of the city of Old Pleuron.
  • 5 [Sport/Deporte] (in baseball) almohadilla (f), base (f)
    More example sentences
    • If they finish the year first in pilfered sacks, it would be the first time since 1938 that the Bronx Bombers led in this category.
    • He started out as a pitcher as many ballplayers do but quickly was moved over to the first sack.
    • Say, for instance, the underhand toss the hurler sent toward the behind (aka catcher) went to the spot you'd indicated and you walloped a shot to the second sack man.
    More example sentences
    • Last year, Babin recorded 15 sacks and 33 tackles behind the line of scrimmage.
    • Joseph has racked up 16 sacks and 34 quarterback hurries since moving to tackle.
    • In 1982, the NFL finally cried uncle and recognized the quarterback sack as an individual statistic.

Definition of sack in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of sack in Spanish:

sack2

vt

  • 2 (destroy) [town/city] saquear
    More example sentences
    • Then, an army of warriors and men dressed in black cowls came from the direction of Plunder castle and sacked the town.
    • Devastating or plundering land without sacking a city was a regular tactic at the time and one that, as long as people had a secure place of retreat, was not particularly fearsome.
    • Commanding 36 ships and 2000 fellow buccaneers, Morgan sacked the town and left his men to the burning and looting.

Phrasal verbs

sack out

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (American English/inglés norteamericano)
[colloquial/familiar] irse* al catre or al sobre or (in Spain also/en España también) a la piltra [colloquial/familiar], acostarse*

Definition of sack in:

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Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.