Translation of saffron in Spanish:

saffron

Pronunciation: /ˈsæfrən/

n

uncountable/no numerable
  • 1.1 [Botany/Botánica] [Cookery/Cocina] azafrán (masculine) (before noun/delante del nombre) saffron rice arroz (masculine) con or al azafrán
    More example sentences
    • To make the dressing, whisk the olive oil, vinegar, mustard, saffron, raisins and their water with sea salt and pepper in a large bowl.
    • In a medium saucepan over medium heat, bring the chicken, onions, cilantro, saffron, cinnamon, butter, oil, gum arabic, and water to a boil.
    • It is not normally found in food but - when illegally added - can increase weight and colour of spices such as chilli peppers, saffron, curry powder and paprika.
    More example sentences
    • One of the most special of the autumn flowering crocus is Crocus sativus, the saffron crocus.
    • But you can actually buy and grow your saffron crocus, Crocus sativus.
    • For example, we learn how the autumn-flowering saffron crocus, which produces the most expensive spice in the world, used to earn its British growers huge fortunes in the 16th century.
    1.2 (color) color (masculine) azafrán; (before noun/delante del nombre) [robe/dress] color azafrán (invariable adjective/adjetivo invariable); [hue] azafranado
    More example sentences
    • It has the familiar, but always appealing, indigo and saffron colour scheme and wooden floor of many modern restaurants.
    • She, with her saffron robes and shaven head, embodies and personifies hard-core Hindutva without, at this late stage of her public career, having to make vitriolic speeches.
    • A vest that can be worn underneath a monk's saffron robes and tested to withstand a round from a powerful handgun retails for abound 200 U.S. dollars.

Definition of saffron in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.