There are 2 translations of scald in Spanish:

scald1

Pronunciation: /skɔːld/

vt

  • 1.1 (burn) [person/skin] escaldar I scalded my hand in the steam me escaldé la mano con el vapor
    More example sentences
    • Surprise, surprise, the first time she braked, the hot liquid went sloshing over her knees and scalded her.
    • ‘As soon as he showed me his back I was horrified, it looked as if he had been scalded,’ said Mrs Gillvray, of Stonehill Rise, Scawthorpe.
    • Thirty minutes after taking the child from the bath, he realised she had been scalded, but he did not seek emergency help.
    1.2 (treat with hot water) [instrument] esterilizar* (con agua hirviendo); [vegetables/meat] escaldar
    More example sentences
    • Take seven red ripe tomatoes, blanch/scald them in boiling water, peel them, remove the seeds and slice into small pieces and put them in a dish.
    • The birds are scalded, de-feathered by machine and transferred to the eviscerating line.
    • Cut the mutton and radish into cubes and scald the mutton.
    1.3 (heat) [milk] calentar* (sin que llegue al punto de ebullición)
    More example sentences
    • On low heat, scald the milk with the vanilla bean.
    • Still, it is a good practice to scald the milk or cream as this precaution will kill bacteria and also dissolve the sugar and help infuse any flavors.
    • Some folks say that you need to scald the milk beforehand, but I had no problem reaching the desired consistency with cold milk.

Definition of scald in:

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Word of the day desesperado
adj
desperate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of scald in Spanish:

scald2

n

  • escaldadura (feminine)

Definition of scald in:

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Word of the day desesperado
adj
desperate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.