Translation of scheme in Spanish:

scheme

Pronunciation: /skiːm/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 (design) the scheme of the novel/symphony el esquema de la novela/de la sinfonía man's place in the scheme of things el lugar del hombre en el (orden del) universo 1.2 (plan) plan (masculine); (underhand) ardid (masculine); (plot) confabulación (feminine), conspiración (feminine) a clever scheme to defraud his employers un hábil plan para estafar a sus patrones
    More example sentences
    • While there may be sound business reasons to focus on clever marketing schemes and building new stadiums, such a focus has come at the expense of the quality of play.
    • He always had various practical schemes and engineering ideas he thought could help other countries.
    • Franchise masters and headquarters staff are on hand to help new franchisees establish their business, and provide planning advice and marketing schemes.
    More example sentences
    • I have no ulterior motives, no plots or secret schemes.
    • They still thought I had secret plans, evil schemes, and I was at a loss as to how to convince them otherwise.
    • With the Filumena caught up in a bootlegging scheme, the plot goes wrong and a constable is murdered, leaving her to hang.
    1.3 (project) (British English/inglés británico) plan (masculine) a savings/pension scheme un plan de ahorro/de pensiones 1.4 (Scotland/Escocia) (housing estate) [colloquial/familiar][ complejo de viviendas subvencionadas ]

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • intrigar*; (plot) conspirar she's always scheming siempre está intrigando, siempre está tramando algo they were scheming against the chairman estaban conspirando contra el presidente, estaban confabulados contra el presidente she was scheming to get his job estaba intrigando or armando intrigas para quedarse con su puesto

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Word of the day airoso
adj
graceful …
Cultural fact of the day

Gringo is a pejorative term in Latin America to refer to white English speakers, particularly North Americans. It has overtones of US intervention in Latin American internal affairs. In the eighteenth century the word was applied to foreigners who spoke little or no Spanish.