Translation of scrounge in Spanish:

scrounge

Pronunciation: /skraʊndʒ/
[colloquial/familiar]

transitive verb/verbo transitivo

  • to scrounge sth from/off sb [food/cigarette/money] gorronearle or gorrearle or (River Plate area/Río de la Plata) garronearle or (Chile) bolsearle algo a algn [colloquial/familiar] she managed to scrounge a ride consiguió que alguien la llevara
    More example sentences
    • Like the queen, he doesn't carry cash, so the billionaire has to scrounge cab fare from colleagues.
    • She expresses her desire to send him as much money as she can scrounge up.
    • As a reviewer I don't get sent everything I ask for and so I scrounge quite a bit - but only for the films I really, really want.
    More example sentences
    • ‘Yes, I was hoping you would scrounge something up for me,’ Anya grinned.
    • As far as I know, the Sidearms were usually issued too officers, but enlisted men were able to scrounge them up easily enough.
    • He scrounged them up in the Municipal Archives on Chambers Street in Manhattan, the address of which he has committed to memory.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo

  • gorronear or gorrear or (River Plate area/Río de la Plata) garronear or (Chile) bolsear [colloquial/familiar] to scrounge around for sth andar* pidiendo algo

noun/nombre

  • [colloquial/familiar] (no plural/sin plural) she's always on the scrounge vive gorroneando or gorreando or (River Plate area/Río de la Plata) garroneando or (Chile) bolseando [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of scrounge in:

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Word of the day bártulos
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Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, pinchos are small portions of food, often on a cocktail stick, eaten in a bar or cafe. Often free, they are similar to tapas, but much smaller. There are pinchos of many foods, including Spanish omelet, ham, sausage, and anchovy.