There are 2 translations of sedate in Spanish:

sedate1

Pronunciation: /sɪˈdeɪt/

adj

  • [person/lifestyle/pace] reposado, tranquilo; [color/decor] sobrio
    More example sentences
    • Tullow Street may look calm and sedate most mid week days but come the weekends it is an entirely different place.
    • This does not reflect well on the sedate, calm and collected gentleman that I hallucinated myself to be.
    • The old rock-and-lava ball had built up a nice ozone shield under which life could evolve at a properly sedate pace.
    More example sentences
    • But all this makes it rather quieter, and more sedate, and a perfect place for stage two.
    • She looked out the front window at the street below them, which appeared deceptively quiet and sedate as a cart rolled by innocently.
    • If you haven't figured it yet, this is an elegy to my city's once quiet, sedate, pleasant city roads, a haven for motorists.

Definition of sedate in:

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Word of the day juerga
f
partying …
Cultural fact of the day

Bullfighting is popular in Spain and in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela. For some Spaniards it is crucial to Spanish identity. The season runs from March to October in Spain, from November to March in Latin America.

There are 2 translations of sedate in Spanish:

sedate2

vt

  • [Medicine/Medicina] [patient/animal] sedar, administrar sedantes a she was heavily sedated le habían administrado un fuerte sedante
    More example sentences
    • His lawyers also claimed that he was heavily sedated with antipsychotic drugs during his trial.
    • The anesthesia care provider then further sedates the patient intravenously.
    • I have no recollection of the actual event, or the following week during which I was heavily sedated.

Definition of sedate in:

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Word of the day juerga
f
partying …
Cultural fact of the day

Bullfighting is popular in Spain and in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Venezuela. For some Spaniards it is crucial to Spanish identity. The season runs from March to October in Spain, from November to March in Latin America.