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seriously

Pronunciation: /ˈsɪriəsli; ˈsɪəriəsli/

Translation of seriously in Spanish:

adverb/adverbio

  • 1 1.1 (not frivolously) seriamente, con seriedad he looked at me seriously me miró serio don't take it seriously no te lo tomes en serio I find it hard to take him seriously me resulta difícil tomarlo en serio she takes herself so seriously se da mucha importancia seriously though (sentence adv) hablando en serio, fuera de broma seriously, when do you plan to leave? (sentence adv) (hablando) en serio ¿cuándo te vas?
    Example sentences
    • They treated my questions seriously and thoughtfully, helping me to see how Christianity answers the issues raised by modern culture.
    1.2 (genuinely, sincerely) you can't seriously mean that no lo puedes estar diciendo en serio are you seriously suggesting that I must pay now? ¿así que lo dices en serio? ¿tengo que pagar ahora? I'm seriously interested in the subject estoy muy interesada en or tengo un gran interés en el tema
  • 2 (gravely) [ill/injured] gravemente the scandal has seriously undermined the government's credibility el escándalo ha perjudicado seriamente la credibilidad del gobierno these figures are seriously misleading estas cifras son muy engañosas
    Example sentences
    • The successfully treated seriously ill are also affected by these service inadequacies.
    • The new hospital will concentrate on very seriously ill children and specialist cases.
    • Consumers can become seriously ill if they eat an egg that is not fully cooked and contaminated with salmonella.

Definition of seriously in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The current Spanish Constitution (Constitución Española) was approved in the Cortes Generales in December 1978. It describes Spain as a parliamentary monarchy, gives sovereign power to the people through universal suffrage, recognizes the plurality of religions, and transfers responsibility for defense from the armed forces to the government. The Constitution was generally well received, except in the Basque Country, whose desire for independence it did not satisfy. It is considered to have facilitated the successful transition from dictatorship to democracy.