Translation of sham in Spanish:

sham

Pronunciation: /ʃæm/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 c and u (pretense) farsa (feminine), parodia (feminine) his grief was all sham o all a sham su pena era pura comedia or puro teatro [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • Rather we read Mark because he is an expert at exposing sham, pretension, and hypocrisy, and because he was the greatest American humorist of the 19th century.
    • Second, Barnes agreed with South Carolina editor Z. T. Cody who ‘called the whole signing up business sham and hypocrisy.’
    • As a satirist, the writer is unafraid of drawing aside the drapes of hypocrisy and sham that seem to safeguard middle-class ethics.
    1.2 countable/numerable (impostor) farsante (masculine and feminine)
    More example sentences
    • The team does not feel the average person today is as ignorant toward shams and charlatans as they might have been just ten years ago.
    • He is a great, flabby sham, an actor close to suicide, maybe - and this is an extraordinary display of incipient madness or incorrigible playfulness.
    • Yet Pétain was no such thing; he was a lifelong soldier and a genuine war hero, rather than some preening sham in jackboots.

adjective/adjetivo

  • [pejorative/peyorativo] (no comparative/sin comparativo) [emotion/interest/sympathy] fingido, falso; [antiques/diamonds] falso, de imitación it was a sham election/trial las elecciones fueron/el juicio fue una farsa or una parodia

transitive verb/verbo transitivo (-mm-)

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo (-mm-)

  • [person] fingir* she's not ill; she's just shamming no está enferma; está haciendo teatro [colloquial/familiar]

Definition of sham in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.