Translation of sherbet in Spanish:

sherbet

Pronunciation: /ˈʃɜːrbət; ˈʃɜːbət/

n

  • 1.1 (sorbet) (AmE) sorbete (m), helado (m) de agua (CS) , nieve (f) (Méx)
    More example sentences
    • Sales of ice milk, sherbets, water ices and novelties continued to increase, but the very foundation of our business, ice cream, started to slip.
    • Keep in mind that - unlike sorbets, sherbets, and most soy desserts - ice creams and frozen yogurts are a decent source or calcium.
    • Fruit-flavored ice creams, sorbets and sherbets benefit from the use of vanilla because the ingredient can balance out acidic notes of the citrus or fruit product.
    1.2 (powder) (BrE) polvos efervescentes con sabor a frutas sidral® (m) (Esp)
    More example sentences
    • The inviting assortment of goodies include acid drops, sherbet lemons, sherbet pips, coconut mushrooms, cinder toffee, Yorkshire mixtures, liquorice sticks, and lollies of all flavours under the sun.
    • My granddad and uncle worked together in a sweet factory, so always had a healthy supply of coconut ice, jelly babies and sherbet dip.
    • A sherbet powder was produced which could either be made into a fizzy drink, or sucked into the mouth, where it would likewise fizz.

Definition of sherbet in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day toque
m
ring …
Cultural fact of the day

peronismo is a political movement, known officially as justicialismo, named for the populist politician Colonel Juan Domingo Perón, elected President of Argentina in 1946. An admirer of Italian fascism, Perón claimed always to be a champion of the workers and the poor, the descamisados (shirtless ones), to whom his first wife Eva Duarte (`Evita') became a kind of icon, especially after her death in 1952. Although he instituted some social reforms, Perón's regime proved increasingly repressive and he was ousted by the army in 1955. He returned from exile to become president in 1973, but died in office a year later. The Partido Justicialista has governed Argentina almost continuously since 1989, under Presidents Carlos Menem, Néstor Kirchner, and Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, Néstor Kirchner's widow, who was re-elected President in 2011.