There are 2 translations of shield in Spanish:

shield1

Pronunciation: /ʃiːld/

n

  • 1 1.1 [History/Historia] [Military/Militar] escudo (masculine) riot shield escudo (masculine) antidisturbios
    More example sentences
    • Patrick whipped out his new shield and the shield defended against the blow.
    • The children are also learning to march like a tortoise as the Romans did, with shields at their side and on top.
    • Doune then caught a heavy blow to his left side, his shield blunting the force of the blow, but stumbled backwards and fell onto his back.
    1.2 (escutcheon) escudo (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • The Shire Hall at the castle, which contains one of the biggest displays of heraldic shields in the country, is world famous and 30 years ago staged the trial of the Birmingham Six.
    • The shield and crest are displayed on William Shakespeare's monument and on Susanna Hall's seal.
    • Upon the shield was the traditional animal, a large bore head with the royal house sword of battle behind it.
    1.3 (badge) escudo (m), insignia (f), distintivo (m)
    More example sentences
    • And I will carry this: It is the police shield of a man named George Howard, who died at the World Trade Center trying to save others.
    • Somebody's in the uniform where they had a badge, or a shield.
    1.4 (trophy) (British English/inglés británico) placa (feminine) (en forma de escudo)
  • 2 (protective cover — on machine) revestimiento (m); (— of animal) caparazón (m) or (f) eye shield visera (feminine) protectora (before noun/delante del nombre) shield law (in (United States/los Estados Unidos) )ley que establece que los periodistas no están obligados a revelar fuentes de información
    More example sentences
    • Actually, this is a shield to prevent gas from blowing back in the shooter's face in the rare event of a failure of some kind.
    • These X-rays heated the interior of the bomb and the tamper; the shield prevented premature detonation of the fuel.
    • The design incorporates a shield which prevents the thumb safely and rear sight from robbing against the body.
    More example sentences
    • The fusion of the cephalic segments is most obvious when a cephalic shield or carapace is present.
    • One photograph of an internal mold of the dorsal shield shows a ‘faint impression of the brain.’
    • The dorsal shield was pierced by a single, large, nostril-like opening situated in the middle of the head in front of the eyes.

Definition of shield in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.

There are 2 translations of shield in Spanish:

shield2

vt

  • to shield sth/sb (from sb/sth) proteger* algo/a algn (de algn/algo) to shield sb from reality proteger* a algn de la realidad the bushes shielded them from view los matorrales los ocultaban shielded cable cable (masculine) blindado
    More example sentences
    • He can do all this and more, but only if he knows the truth and is not shielded behind a cocoon of manufactured perceptions.
    • When our hero passed, she could barely look him in the eye, she just shielded herself behind her sympathetic companions.
    • As I am sitting on the floor and shielded by the shelves it is basically impossible to see me from the creative room.

Definition of shield in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day reubicar
vt
to relocate …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain the term castellano, rather than español, refers to the Spanish language as opposed to Catalan, Basque etc. The choice of word has political overtones: castellano has separatist connotations and español is considered centralist. In Latin America castellano is the usual term for Spanish.