There are 2 translations of shriek in Spanish:

shriek1

Pronunciation: /ʃriːk/

n

  • grito (m), chillido (m) to let out a shriek dar* or pegar* un grito or chillido a shriek of pain un grito or alarido de dolor a shriek of delight/terror un grito or chillido de placer/terror the shriek of a train whistle el agudo pitido de un tren with a shriek of tires con un chirrido de neumáticos we could hear shrieks of laughter oíamos risotadas
    More example sentences
    • All the shrieks and screams inside sound like wind from the outside.
    • The boy started to scream, not a yell of pain but a high-pitched shriek of panic that reminded me of a rabbit's death throes, which reminded me that I was hungry.
    • Now maybe it'll go away - It let out a high-pitched shriek and Robyn screamed, now fully awake.

Definition of shriek in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.

There are 2 translations of shriek in Spanish:

shriek2

vi

  • gritar, chillar to shriek with pain gritar de dolor to shriek with laughter reírse* histéricamente to shriek at sb gritarle or chillarle a algn stop shrieking at me! ¡no me chilles!
    More example sentences
    • Chehl tried to get free, shrieking in pain and terror, but he couldn't break loose.
    • I shrieked with laughter, which is what you do with Rosemary, for her own contagious laugh is as big as she is.
    • Sadie shrieked with laughter, and looked up to the sky.

Definition of shriek in:

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Word of the day torta
f
pie …
Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.