Translation of shrug in Spanish:

shrug

Pronunciation: /ʃrʌg/

noun/nombre

  • 1 (movement) with a shrug (of her shoulders) encogiéndose de hombros to give a shrug (of indifference) encogerse* de hombros (con indiferencia)
    More example sentences
    • What was anticipated as a big fat Greek embrace turned instead into a casual shrug of the shoulders.
    • Any restaurant that gets a shrug of the shoulders and a hand waving in the manner of an umpire should consider it a moral victory.
    • There is no outrage, just a shrug of the shoulders.
  • 2 [Clothing/Indumentaria] bolero (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Also key is quirky detail: a velvet ribbon tied at the waist of a jacket; a fur shrug worn over a sloppy knit; a brooch or a corsage fastening a cardigan.
    • Real or faux fur, shrugs, stoles or capelets are also great alternatives.
    • Also a light brown camisole tank top, and a short white sweater shrug that had a chocolate brown colored tie in the front.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo (-gg-)

transitive verb/verbo transitivo (-gg-)

Phrasal verbs

shrug off

verb + object + adverb, verb + adverb + object/verbo + complemento + adverbio, verbo + adverbio + complemento
[misfortune/disappointment] superar, sobreponerse* a; [criticism] hacer* caso omiso de, no dejarse afectar por

Definition of shrug in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.