Translation of simulate in Spanish:

simulate

Pronunciation: /ˈsɪmjəleɪt; ˈsɪmjʊleɪt/

vt

  • 1.1 (reproduce) simular a simulated attack un simulacro de ataque
    More example sentences
    • But the dead giveaway on almost any of these fraudulent emails is not the painstakingly simulated appearance or the sophisticated coding, but the grammar!
    • He explains that the video was supposed to go through a film filter, simulating the appearance of film.
    • Under the opulent chandelier of the Continental Hotel, well-heeled characters try to simulate bourgeois normality in a world of chaotic street battles and high-level skulduggery.
    1.2 (feign) [indignation/enthusiasm] simular, aparentar, fingir*
    More example sentences
    • The message seems to be that it's inhuman to torture a nonhuman who simulates human emotion convincingly enough.
    • At best, they claim, clever programming might allow it to simulate human emotions, but these would just be clever fakes.
    • Here's how it goes: in live theatre, you're in the same physical space as people who are simulating fury or misery or excitement or love.
    1.3
    (simulated past participle of/participio pasado de)
    simulado simulated fur piel (feminine) sintética simulated pearls perlas (feminine plural) artificiales

Definition of simulate in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Most first names in Spanish-speaking countries are those of saints. A person's santo, (also known as onomástico in Latin America and onomástica in Spain) is the saint's day of the saint that they are named for. Children were once usually named for the saint whose day they were born on, but this is less common now.