There are 2 translations of sin in Spanish:

sin1

Pronunciation: /sɪn/

n

countable or uncountable/numerable o no numerable
  • pecado (masculine) mortal/venial sin pecado mortal/venial the seven deadly sins los siete pecados capitales it's a sin to waste food es un crimen or un pecado tirar la comida for my sins [humorous/humorístico] para mi castigo [humorous/humorístico] to live in sin [dated or humorous/anticuado o humorístico] vivir en concubinato or [anticuado/dated] amancebado to be as miserable as sin ser* un/una cascarrabias to be as ugly as sin ser* más feo que pegarle a Dios or que Picio [colloquial/familiar] wage1
    More example sentences
    • We now live in, and scientists study, a creation damaged by human sin and divine judgment.
    • Part of the transgression of a sin is using something holy for an unholy purpose.
    • Cole fears that his supernatural abilities themselves are a sin, and Malcolm's sin is the classic sin of unbelief.

Definition of sin in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.

There are 2 translations of sin in Spanish:

sin2

vi (-nn-)

  • pecar* to sin against sth/sb pecar* contra algo/algn more sinned against than sinning más bien el ofendido que el ofensor
    More example sentences
    • To sin against the Holy Spirit is to sin against hope.
    • I hereby forgive everyone who offended or angered me, or sinned against me.
    • To live in this world was to live in the expectation of sinning and being sinned against.

Definition of sin in:

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Word of the day pegado
adj
su casa está pegada a la mía = her house is right next to mine …
Cultural fact of the day

In Spain, a privately owned school that receives no government funds is called a colegio privado. Parents pay monthly fees. Colegios privados cover all stages of primary and secondary education.