Translation of sisterhood in Spanish:

sisterhood

Pronunciation: /ˈsɪstərhʊd; ˈsɪstəhʊd/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 countable/numerable (association of women) asociación (feminine) de mujeres
    More example sentences
    • Religious brotherhoods and sisterhoods play an important role in organizing these ceremonies and festivals.
    • In a world of brotherhoods and sisterhoods there was always the existence of secret societies.
    • Although women could not be priests or bishops, convents and sisterhoods provided professional opportunities to women in a society where few respectable professional outlets existed.
    1.2 countable/numerable [Religion/Religión] congregación (feminine) 1.3 uncountable/no numerable (sisterly relationship) solidaridad (feminine) ([ entre mujeres ])
    More example sentences
    • There is no sisterhood among sisters here, only envy fuelled by despair.
    • In 1991, Juliet made Blood Sisters, a film essay which explored the mythologies of sisterhood.
    • I can't know what it's like to be a woman, or even how exactly to be a dad to girls, but I know something of sisters, and even perhaps of sisterhood, if I may be so bold.

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.