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slog
American English: /slɑɡ/
British English: /slɒɡ/

Translation of slog in Spanish:

noun (no plural)

[colloquial]
  • 1 (struggle, toil) See examples: it was a long slog up the hill
    subir la cuesta fue un gran esfuerzo or nos ( or les etc) costó mucho
    we've got a long slog ahead of us
    tenemos un largo y arduo camino por delante
    Example sentences
    • ‘It's hard, work, a hard slog and I wish you the best of luck,’ said Mr Miller.
    • I'm working with you everyday to get those chubby legs of yours to assume more responsibility, but this is a hard slog as your are so very stubborn.
    • ‘It is marvellous to see something like this coming together after so many years of a hard slog,’ she said.
  • 2 (blow) he gave the ball a hard slog
    bateó ( or pateó etc) la pelota con fuerza
    Example sentences
    • Bichel went to tea on 45 not out with a series of arrow-straight slogs, and brought up his maiden Test fifty straight after tea with a driven single off Banks.
    • I've got past my horrendous slog in the first innings, so we'll be trying hard.
    • A couple of slogs by Sami then happened and he was caught plumb in front by Kumble.

intransitive verb -gg-

  • caminar trabajosamente
    we slogged up the hill
    subimos la colina con dificultad or con gran esfuerzo
    Example sentences
    • You could be sitting there in absolutely untenable conditions, in water that is filled with disease and germs for months to come, walking through it, slogging through it.
    • You're slogging through the mud every step of the way.
    • With difficulty, he slogged toward the door we entered from.

transitive verb -gg-

  • to slog it out
    (fight to the end)
    luchar hasta el final
    (fight)
    pelear a puñetazos
    they were slogging it out on the street
    estaban peleando a puñetazos en la calle
    they're slogging it out for control of the market
    están luchando todo lo que pueden por conseguir el control del mercado
    Example sentences
    • His company makes the rival whiskey which slogs it out for the hearts of the southern drinker.
    • At least the diary section of the site is still a good laugh, where you can read about Lucy slogging it out in crap clubs in Stockport and Dundee in an effort to place her single this week.
    • I'm sure they were slogging it out like we were at around the same time.

Phrasal verbs

slog away

verb + adverb (British English)
[colloquial]
trabajar duro (especially Latin America)

Definition of slog in:

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    Pronunciation: ˈduːfʌs
    noun
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    Cultural fact of the day

    onces

    In some Andean countries, particularly Chile, onces is a light meal eaten between five and six p.m., the equivalent of "afternoon tea" in Britain. In Colombia, on the other hand, onces is a light snack eaten between breakfast and lunch. It is also known as mediasnueves.