Translation of slog in Spanish:

slog

Pronunciation: /slɑːg; slɒg/

noun/nombre

[colloquial/familiar] (no plural/sin plural)
  • 1 (struggle, toil) it was a long slog up the hill subir la cuesta fue un gran esfuerzo or nos ( or les etc) costó mucho we've got a long slog ahead of us tenemos un largo y arduo camino por delante
    More example sentences
    • ‘It's hard, work, a hard slog and I wish you the best of luck,’ said Mr Miller.
    • I'm working with you everyday to get those chubby legs of yours to assume more responsibility, but this is a hard slog as your are so very stubborn.
    • ‘It is marvellous to see something like this coming together after so many years of a hard slog,’ she said.
  • 2 (blow) golpe (masculine) he gave the ball a hard slog bateó ( or pateó etc) la pelota con fuerza
    More example sentences
    • Bichel went to tea on 45 not out with a series of arrow-straight slogs, and brought up his maiden Test fifty straight after tea with a driven single off Banks.
    • I've got past my horrendous slog in the first innings, so we'll be trying hard.
    • A couple of slogs by Sami then happened and he was caught plumb in front by Kumble.

intransitive verb/verbo intransitivo (-gg-)

  • caminar trabajosamente we slogged up the hill subimos la colina con dificultad or con gran esfuerzo

transitive verb/verbo transitivo (-gg-)

  • golpear to slog it out (fight to the end) luchar hasta el final (fight) pelear a puñetazos they were slogging it out on the street estaban peleando a puñetazos en la calle they're slogging it out for control of the market están luchando todo lo que pueden por conseguir el control del mercado

Phrasal verbs

slog away

verb + adverb/verbo + adverbio (British English/inglés británico)
[colloquial/familiar] sudar tinta [colloquial/familiar], trabajar duro (especially Latin America/especialmente América Latina)

Definition of slog in:

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Cultural fact of the day

The National Police (Policía Nacional) was set up in Spain in 1976. Its members patrol provincial capitals and big cities, which are responsible for its finance, administration, and recruitment. Although armed, it has never been considered a repressive force, unlike the Guardia Civil.