There are 2 translations of smash in Spanish:

smash1

Pronunciation: /smæʃ/

n

  • 1 1.1 (sound) estrépito (m) , estruendo (m) there was a loud smash as he dropped the plates los platos se le cayeron con gran estrépito the smash of the waves on the rocks el ruido de las olas al romper contra las rocas 1.2 (collision) (BrE) choque (m)

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Word of the day saliva
f
saliva …
Cultural fact of the day

The name of the autonomous governments of Catalonia and Valencia is generalitat. A great deal of power has now been transferred to them from central government. The medieval term generalitat was revived in 1932, when Catalonia voted for its own devolved government. After the Civil War, it was abolished by Franco but was restored in 1978, with the establishment of comunidades autónomascomunidad autónoma. The Valencian Generalitat is keen to preserve the traditions of the region from Catalan influence.

There are 2 translations of smash in Spanish:

smash2

vt

  • 3 3.1 (hit, drive forcefully) he smashed his fist into my face me pegó un puñetazo en la cara I smashed my fist through the window rompí la ventana de un puñetazo 3.2 (in tennis, badminton, squash) rematar , remachar

vi

  • 1 (shatter) [glass/wood] hacerse* pedazos it smashed into a thousand pieces se hizo añicos, se rompió en mil pedazos
  • 2 (crash) to smash against/into sth [car/waves] estrellarse or chocar* contra algo

Phrasal verbs

smash in

v + o + adv, v + adv + o
[door] tirar abajo; [window/glass] romper* he threatened to smash my face in [colloquial/familiar] me amenazó con partirme or romperme la cara [familiar/colloquial]

smash up

v + o + adv
[colloquial/familiar] destrozar*

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Definition of smash in:

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Word of the day saliva
f
saliva …
Cultural fact of the day

The name of the autonomous governments of Catalonia and Valencia is generalitat. A great deal of power has now been transferred to them from central government. The medieval term generalitat was revived in 1932, when Catalonia voted for its own devolved government. After the Civil War, it was abolished by Franco but was restored in 1978, with the establishment of comunidades autónomascomunidad autónoma. The Valencian Generalitat is keen to preserve the traditions of the region from Catalan influence.