Translation of smut in Spanish:

smut

Pronunciation: /smʌt/

noun/nombre

  • 1.1 uncountable/no numerable (offensive material) inmundicia (feminine), indecencia (feminine) she declared the program pure smut dijo que el programa era una inmundicia or una indecencia
    More example sentences
    • Since the first one appeared in 1964, there's been a debate about whether it's filth, smut, porn, tasteful erotica or high art.
    • If some readers did not approve the Times of India which has pioneered smut and erotica in the Delhi Times (sometimes in the guise of sex education), it would not be the highest circulated English paper in the country.
    • He has warned ‘cosmopolitan, liberal secular Jews’ of the fate they will suffer for assaulting Christianity with smut and pornography and the murder of the unborn.
    1.2 countable/numerable (dirt, soot) mancha (feminine) de tizne, tiznajo (masculine), tizne (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Acid smuts had damaged clothing hung out to dry in his garden and the paintwork of the plaintiff's car parked in the highway.
    • On the tube, already doubly late, trying to get to King's Cross in time for the Intercity, I noticed in the squeeze a woman with a smut on her forehead.
    1.3 uncountable/no numerable (fungus) tizón (masculine), añublo (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • Onion smut produces dark powder streaks on seedlings of the onion family.
    • The primary purpose of treating wheat seed is to protect it from the smut diseases with common bunt being the target disease this season.
    • Therefore, a combination of an effective smut fungicide plus a fungicide effective against seedling blights is recommended.

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Word of the day ochavo
m
old Spanish coin of little value …
Cultural fact of the day

Mexico's muralist movement flourished between the two World Wars during a time of nationalist fervor. It was led by Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, and David Alfaro Siqueiros. Their work reflected revolutionary themes and working-class struggle. They decorated many public buildings.