Translation of snappy in Spanish:

snappy

Pronunciation: /ˈsnæpi/

adj (-pier, -piest)

  • 1.1 [dog] que muerde; [person] irascible, irritable; [retort] brusco, cortante
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    • I'm not someone who's endlessly patient and wonderful - in fact I'm quite snappy and irritable - and I don't know if I'd like to make myself worse in that respect.
    • He'd read twice through every book in the house, and he'd become irritable and snappy.
    • I'm suddenly nervous and snappy with Dan, who is driving the support van.
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    • For the most part though, Gilman covers all her bases, writing in snappy, clever prose that keeps the pages turning.
    • It should have clear headings, concise paragraphs and snappy sentences.
    • Dialogue is snappy and modern and peppered with expletives.
    1.2 (brisk, lively) [colloquial/familiar] [tune] alegre; [pace] ágil, brioso; [conversation] animado, vivaz look snappy! ¡muévete! [familiar/colloquial], ¡date prisa! put your uniform on and make it snappy! ponte el uniforme ¡y rápido! 1.3 (concise, punchy) [colloquial/familiar] [phrase/style] conciso y vigoroso a snappy slogan un eslogan con gancho [familiar/colloquial] 1.4 (stylish) [colloquial/familiar] elegante
    More example sentences
    • He was looking snappy in his cool button-up shirt that he didn't button-up all the way, his trendy denims, and his new white shoes.
    • Quick-thinking interplay and a snappy first-time shot from Nick Davies off his back foot halved the gap.
    • Close friends insist that the idea that Elspeth has ‘groomed’ her husband is way off the mark - he was, they point out, already a snappy dresser before he met his wife.

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Word of the day precioso
adj
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Cultural fact of the day

Sanfermines (The festival of San Fermín) is from 6th-14th July and el encierro (the 'running of the bulls'), takes place in Pamplona in northern Spain. The animals are released into the barricaded streets and people run in front of them, in honor of the town´s patron saint, San Fermín, who was put to death by being dragged by bulls.