Translation of snout in Spanish:

snout

Pronunciation: /snaʊt/

noun/nombre

  • 1 countable/numerable 1.1 (of animal) hocico (masculine), morro (masculine)
    More example sentences
    • They have a pointed snout, and the mouth contains teeth.
    • All tapirs have a short, fleshy proboscis formed by the snout and upper lips.
    • Beneath the projecting snout there is a small, toothless mouth with thick, sucking lips.
    1.2 [colloquial/familiar] (of person) narizota (feminine) [colloquial/familiar]
    More example sentences
    • And the kitchen door opened and May stuck her snout into the room again.
    • But we should not be sticking our snout in there.
    • After trailing the champions throughout, it seemed that all Cork needed was to get their snouts in front, but after drawing up alongside their opponents as the game swung in to the final five minutes Cork couldn't eke out a lead.
    More example sentences
    • The opprobrium that once attached to informers, snitches, snouts, shoppers and narks in all walks of life no longer exists.
    • Most believe that, as a police snout, he set them up for lengthy jail sentences.
    • Apparently, a third of calls to the cheatline relate to household insurance, with snouts telling tales about burglaries that never happened or fires started by ‘accident’.
  • 2 uncountable/no numerable (British English/inglés británico) [slang/argot] (tobacco) tabaco (masculine)
  • 3 countable/numerable (British English/inglés británico) [slang/argot] (informer) soplón, (masculine, feminine) [colloquial/familiar], chivato, (masculine, feminine) (Spain/España) [colloquial/familiar]

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain had three civil wars known as the guerras carlistas (1833-39, 1860, 1872-76). When Fernando VII died in 1833, he was succeeded not by his brother the Infante Don Carlos de Borbón, but by his daughter Isabel, under the regency of her mother María Cristina. This provoked a mainly northern-Spanish revolt, with local guerrillas pitted against the forces of the central government. The Carlist Wars were also a confrontation between conservative rural Catholic Spain, especially the Basque provinces and Aragón, led by the carlistas, and the progressive liberal urban middle classes allied with the army. Carlos died in 1855, but the carlistas, representing political and religious traditionalism, supported his descendants' claims until reconciliation in 1977 with King Juan Carlos.