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snowy

Pronunciation: /ˈsnəʊi/

Translation of snowy in Spanish:

adjective/adjetivo (snowier, snowiest)

  • 1.1 [day] nevoso, de nieve; [weather] nevoso; [landscape/path] nevado
    Example sentences
    • He was in a sea of pine bushes covering the snowy valley of another mountain strip.
    • We crept downstairs over warm, underfloor-heated carpets to a blazing fire in the sitting room, a mound of presents underneath the tree and huge windows gazing out on to snowy mountains.
    • They drive across the country to his remote log cabin in snowy mountains, bonding along the way despite their implacably opposed positions in the situation.
    Example sentences
    • Rainy or snowy weather also affects driver visibility and control of the vehicle.
    • During extremely cold, snowy periods raccoons have been observed sleeping for long periods at a time, but do not hibernate.
    • However, it must be stated that the majority of Scotland's population do not endure severe, snowy winters.
    1.2 [literary/literario] (white) blanco como la nieve, níveo [literary/literario]
    Example sentences
    • Above them was a castle made of pure, white snowy clouds.
    • Her dress was pure snowy white, of course, simple and off-the-shoulder.
    • Her snowy white hair rose like a wedding cake on the crown of her tiny head, every curl lacquered in place with multiple applications of hairspray.

Definition of snowy in:

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Cultural fact of the day

Spain's 1978 Constitution granted areas of competence competencias to each of the autonomous regions it created. It also established that these could be modified by agreements, called estatutos de autonomía or just estatutos, between central government and each of the autonomous regions. The latter do not affect the competencias of central government which controls the army, etc. For example, Navarre, the Basque Country and Catalonia have their own police forces and health services, and collect taxes on behalf of central government. Navarre has its own civil law system, fueros, and can levy taxes which are different to those in the rest of Spain. In 2006, Andalusia, Valencia and Catalonia renegotiated their estatutos. The Catalan Estatut was particularly contentious.